Queer & Trans Liberation

GEO is happy to announce that we will once again be offering our Advancing the Development of Worker Cooperatives one-day mini-conference in conjunction with the Eastern Conference for Workplace Democracy.  This presession will be held on Friday, June 9th from 9:00 am - 5:00 pm.  The day will be broken into two sessions.  Cost are $55 for one of the sessions, or $90 for the full day (lunch is included for

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When I was a wee freshman in college, I would come back home for winter break to confidently inform my family of all of the tragic woes in the world and what was needed to fix them. My dad would always back-handedly reply, “That’s what’s wrong with you liberals. You think you’re always right.” I was offended, first by the categorizing of my ideals as being liberal, and second because what I was saying was right. There is a right and a wrong to the world and I was on the right side of it.

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If there is anything human I would label “evil,” it is shame, with guilt being a close second. Both are at the heart of moral righteousness.

I need to say some more about the thinking I expressed in my earlier blog. My main point was and is that our most meaningful and effective protests have their source in sharp strategic thinking that is free of moral righteousness. Full of passion grounded in our values and concerns for a world that can work well, but not in moral righteousness.

Our alt/Right, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, etc. are a form of resistance to the profound cultural, political, and economic changes that are happening globally.* They are hopelessly fighting a losing battle. In fact, the intensity of their moral righteousness is the measure of their hopelessness. Even Steve Bannon says this: “Ethno-nationalism—it's losers.

Naomi Klein has an interesting article in the latest issue of the Nation, Daring to Dream in the Age of Trump. I recommend it. Much to appreciate, disagree with, and discuss. I want to focus on two features of it, one I find quite surprising and one that is so typical and so disempowering of the Democratic Left.

A conversation with Darya Marchenkova and Brian Van Slyke of the Toolbox for Education and Social Action (TESA) worker co-op. Topics include TESA's new board game Rise Up!, what it's like to work in a geographically distributed collective, and how the collective has balanced consensus  and autonomous decision-making.

Toolbox for Education and Social Action website

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[Editor's note: this is the first of a two-part conversation between Cliff Martin and Len Krimerman that was originally recorded as an episode of the GEO podcast.  Unfortunately, the recording quality was quite low, even by our standards, and we didn't feel comfortable subjecting listeners to it.  So we're presenting the conversation in text form, below.  Thanks to Rob Brown for doing the transcription.]

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cross-posted from Shareable

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The Boston Ujima Project is empowering residents in underserved communities in Boston, to fund and invest in the businesses they want to support in their neighborhoods. Founders, friends, and members of the project explain the impetus behind the project and how they see it as paving the way for community control in increasingly oppressive times.

 

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Becoming the Change 5.

This is how I concluded my blog last week on what seems to be the promise of Piketty’s work:

It seems to me that some heavyweight mainstream economic thinking is emerging that might be very supportive co-operative/solidarity and other movements for alternative economics. But that still leaves us with the overarching problem of how do we generate the power to move our movements more dynamically.  

If cooperative and solidarity economy organizers are serious about creating democratic, cooperative culture, they need to focus more on working in middle and high schools.
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A diversity of kindred approaches to alternative political economics is emerging across the country.  Many of them share a regional focus. This is showing unusual potential for advancing the development of worker co-operatives through inter-cooperative and cross-sector networking.  We are calling this Regional Cooperative/Solidarity Economic Development (C/SE) (Please see the note below on why we are using this unusual phrase, “cooperative/solidarity.”)

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This article was first published in GEO Newsletter Vol. 1, Issue 72/73, 2007

The contemporary U.S. worker cooperative movement is somewhat ambiguous about its relationship to capitalism.  Members of our movement today range in perspective from viewing cooperatives as an anti-capitalist tool of struggle, "embodying the world that we seek to build," to seeing them as worker-empowering additions to an economic system believed to be either inevitable or in need of only minor modification.

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Permanent link to this article: http://geo.coop/node/449

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