The Slow Money Revolution

By Cliona O Conaill, New Consumer magazine

Local currencies have been gaining momentum over the last 15 to 20 years: from Bali, where they have had a dual currency for centuries; to Curitiba, in Brazil, where pre-sorted rubbish earns you bus tokens. There is even an electronic currency in Japan called ?Love? accrued through doing social welfare activities. Over 4,000 communities worldwide use them according to Bernard Lietaer. Local currencies are part of the Slow Money Movement because they are physical money and require face-to-face contact to use, which slows down the speed that the money circulates...

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