Intentional communities are intrinsically idealistic. They’re based on a radical analysis of social problems and are an attempt to address them. They represent a personal desire to live in a way that feels more satisfying, but also the desire for a better society for all people.

IDS and others have done a huge amount of work over the decades to make the case that ‘participation’, understood as people engaging in society and in the decisions that impact their lives, is recognised as a right held by all.

Much progress has been made.

Each week, 21 high-street pubs shut in England, according to the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA), a group that lobbied for a 2011 law which protects former pubs from demolition or a change of use by requiring local people to be consulted first.

The $17.2 trillion banking industry is riding high in the current economy: Profits are up, new tax cuts are in, and the industry has more capital than ever before.

So why are the bankers so obsessed about the tax status of not-for-profit credit unions?

Last month, Dallas Robinson received an email from someone she didn’t know, asking if she would be open to receiving a large sum of money—with no strings attached. For once, it wasn’t spam. She hit reply.

Is it not perverse that Ivy League-educated white men from predominantly white male dominated institutions are able to accrue wealth by investing in African American women entrepreneurs — now that diversity is considered an asset, and the latest example of doing well by doing good — while the majority of African American women are excluded from building wealth through impact in

Make no mistake: employee ownership is not some pie-in-the-sky, utopian scheme with no grounding in real-world economics. It is a reliable and time-tested model that is generating jobs and reinvigorating communities across the globe.

If you’re a boomer business owner planning for succession, you can’t afford to overlook the employee ownership option.


[W]e're seeing communities come together to meet their own needs by cultivating community gardens, sharing meals, supporting local businesses, running repair cafes and other workshops, and collaborating on neighborhood upliftment projects. 

Shared Capital seeks a diverse pool of candidates representing different backgrounds, cooperative experiences and geographic regions. Many different skills and expertise add value to our board, including knowledge and experience in cooperative governance, finance, lending, investing, law, marketing, member engagement, cooperative development and CDFIs. Most importantly we are looking for people who are committed to our mission and our work and able to participate fully on the board and at least one committee.


TA: Thank you for agreeing to talk to me. It would be great, to start, to hear a little bit about the history of your co-op, what you are trying to do and what your goals are for the future.


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