Gleanings

Greenwashing has been around for some years now. Corporations were not slow to realize that re-branding their products as “green” was a quicker, and much cheaper way to hold on to consumer loyalties than going the arduous, more expensive route of actually making their products better for the environment.

Since the global financial system unraveled in 2008, U.S. policymakers have struggled heroically to improve the performance and oversight of global banks and investment firms.

The New York City Network of Worker Cooperatives will hold its first annual conference of presentations and discussions about economic democracy and the road to economic justice.

Online platforms are making it possible again for people to share resources such as cars, homes and time. As well as bringing people together, they’re a way to save money in a tepid economy.

 

What is the role that cooperative economics has played in African American history and the civil rights movement? Last month, GRITtv guest Jessica Gordon Nembhard and Black Women's Blueprint Executive Director Farah Tanis had a conversation about how cooperative economics plays a role in both the past and present in African-American history.

See more from GRITtv

On the face of it, Loconomics and Bring It Local sound like typical tech startups.

But behind the scenes, both companies are fomenting a quiet revolution in their business structures. They are organizing themselves as cooperatives - for-profit enterprises owned by the people who work for and use the services.

Read the full article at SFGate

‘Building Resilience in the Malawian Co‑operative Movement’, by Sara Vicari and Alexander Borda-Rodriguez, is the outcome of a one-year, Leverhulme-funded collaborative research project between the Co-operative College and The Open University.

In the Bronx borough of New York City stands a proud pioneering housing co-operative affectionately known as The Amalgamated.

Could Jackson, Mississippi become the capital of cooperative economics in the south?  Mayor Chokwe Lumumba imagined it this way, championing a vision of solidarity economics to heal the city's economic wounds and move forward into a new, more inclusive economy.

Watch more at GRITtv

A vision of a community-led “solidarity economy” is capturing the attention of a new generation of progressive New Yorkers.  Seeking to address the ecological, economic, and political crises of our time, local groups are reinvigorating cooperative economic models and inventing new ones, putting into action a vision for an economic system that is based on values of social and racial justice, ecological sustainability, c

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