Gleanings

Some Spaniards are moving away from the country’s electric utilities “to form consumer cooperatives that generate or purchase power from renewable energy sources,” reports The Wall Street Journal.

“Their ranks—while still tiny—are being fed by consumer discontent over a government decision to curtail green-energy projects. The defections highlight the latest fallout from a broader debate over green energy now raging across Europe.”

Read the full article on Wall Street Journal Europe

The frustration of the left, given this exhaustion of traditional socialisms' appeal, arose from having no other broadly agreed-upon vision of an attractive alternative to capitalism. The left could not provide what mass audiences craved as they deepened their criticisms of capitalism's longer-term decline and short-term crisis.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: GEO has been following Mayor Gayle McLaughlin for over two years: here, here, and here. Now the NYTimes has caught up with her.)

Eminent Domain: a Long Shot Against Blight

By SHAILA DEWAN

The year 2014 will see the publication of the UNRISD volume on SSE comprised of papers originally presented at the conference on the Potential and Limits of Social and Solidarity Economy in May 2013.

In November, Mondragon – a conglomerate stretching from banking to supermarkets with revenues – decided to let its oldest member file for protection against its creditors.

The objective of this conference is to promote and support the development of Cooperative Enterprises and Development in the City of Jackson, MS.

Chris Agee is loading boxes of food and drink products on to a conveyor belt down in the basement of a grocery store in Brooklyn, New York.

One floor above him, shoppers push trolleys up and down the aisles, picking up their weekly groceries.

The problem of informality represents one of the major challenges in the fight against poverty. To address this issue, the traditional response has often been to apply Western entrepreneurial rationality to informal actors and consider small informal productive units as pre-capitalist firms whose growth potential can be realized, it is supposed, by providing them with adequate tools such as credit or training. But do informal initiatives really share the capitalist spirit of entrepreneurship or do they develop other rationales, such as the ones which spread in a "solidarity economy"?

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