What co-ops can teach you about rural life

In rural and remote western Canada, working together is necessary. Without the support of neighbours, family and friends, much of the development created, maintained and developing in rural and remote areas simply wouldn’t and couldn’t take place.

Most of the time this “working together” is not formal nor is it incorporated into a legal business entity, like a co-op. It’s simply neighbours working together to get crops off the field, roads cleared of snow drifts, farm machinery fixed or community buildings – like churches, rinks and schools – built.

When farmers and rural community leaders need to create capacity to build infrastructure or formally organize to compete in larger markets, the co-op model is often a natural fit

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